‘Canoe’ flutes from the Cerro Toro Formation, Chile

There have recently been a few posts on sole marks, including flutes from "clastic detritus" (who gives a nice overview of flutes) and groove casts from "Dynamic Earth." In an episode of 'classic one upmanship,' in poker terms I see both your sole marks, and I raise you some 'canoe' flutes from Patagonian Chile. These …

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“Geology on the Wing” Wednesdays #4 – Point bar and counter point bar, Brazos river

The Brazos river runs from the high mountains of New Mexico all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico, meandering through almost all of Texas.  It is relatively unmodified by humans (as American rivers go), and thus displays great fluvial architectures.  The water level in the river in this photo was quite low, due …

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Submarine channel asymmetry in a gravel-rich system, Cerro Toro Fm, Chile

One of the main purposes of publishing research is to get as many eyes on your results as soon as possible. A recent work that my co-authors (Anne Bernhardt and Don Lowe) and I published and would like the world to know about concerns some outcrops of submarine channels in the the Magallanes Basin, Chile. …

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“Geology on the Wing” Wednesdays #2 – Grand Tetons, Wyoming

#2 in the weekly series is a 'shingled' image of the Grand Tetons that I thought was too good to use only once.  This image is taken looking almost due east from 17,000 feet - Grand Teton (tallest of the three in the middle) stands nearly 14,000 feet.  Notice that even in early July, there …

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