Climbing-ripple successions in turbidite systems: depositional environments, sedimentation rates and accumulation times

Wow, that is a title right there! The third and final paper (PDF) of my thesis is finally published - I submitted this paper in 2010, and it was published online in the fall of 2011. Now however, it is finally out in print, and it feels real now. It was my most 'academic' project, …

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Geology on the Wing Wednesdays #9 – Atchafalaya river delta, Louisiana

I love this shot of the Gulf Coast just west of the Mississippi delta: Note this plane has a slightly larger wing than the normal photos I post 🙂 I could try to explain the history of the Atchafalaya and how the Mississippi would have avulsed to this location if the US Army Corps of …

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Geology on the Wing Wednesdays #8 – Abandoned Sabine river delta near Cameron, Louisiana

The Sabine river has a very interesting coastal history, mostly documented by Rufus LeBlanc.  He shows a pattern of modern avulsions of the river updip from the coastline, leading to at least two deltas.  Due to low sediment supply and the position of the coastline with the dominant Gulf winds, the deltas are wave dominated. …

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Geology on the Wing Wednesdays #6 – Multiple-inlet barrier system, Barataria Bay, Lousiana

OK folks, I am back in action - on the way back from Florida the other weekend I took this photo of Barataria bay for my buddy Nick.  Barataria bay is located just west of the Mississippi Rivera tidal basin behind a multiple-inlet barrier system, and is a great natural laboratory for coastal dynamics.  Nick …

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Counter point bars in fluvial AND deepwater channels?

The Geology on the Wing Wednesday post about counter point bars on the Brazos river has provoked a few questions, so I thought it would be a good idea to expand on it a little bit. Meandering(or sinuous) channels migrate, and can do so one of at least two ways. The first is by translation, …

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