Geology on the Wing Wednesdays #11 – Washita River meanders, Oklahoma

I've decided to start posting again after a hiatus, and I will start it off by reviving an old series called "Geology on the Wing Wednesdays". Generally, these are photos I have taken of various places while flying low and slow in search of a $100 hamburger. This week's GOTWW comes from near Anadarko, Oklahoma, …

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Exceptional dunes, Miocene fluvial rocks, central Spain

Ahh yes, does this remind you of Reservoir Dogs?  If you are lost, google it and see the similarities... These are some beautiful exposures in the Loranca basin of central Spain.  This beautiful area is home to the Tortola Formation, a Miocene fluvial succession displaying 'labyrrinthine' facies architecture (whatever that means). Overall this succession is a …

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Counter point bars in fluvial AND deepwater channels?

The Geology on the Wing Wednesday post about counter point bars on the Brazos river has provoked a few questions, so I thought it would be a good idea to expand on it a little bit. Meandering(or sinuous) channels migrate, and can do so one of at least two ways. The first is by translation, …

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“Geology on the Wing” Wednesdays #4 – Point bar and counter point bar, Brazos river

The Brazos river runs from the high mountains of New Mexico all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico, meandering through almost all of Texas.  It is relatively unmodified by humans (as American rivers go), and thus displays great fluvial architectures.  The water level in the river in this photo was quite low, due …

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“Geology on the Wing” Wednesdays #1 – Oxbows and terraces, Utah

Inspired by weekly series by clastic detritus and many other geoblogs comes a new series called "Geology on the Wing".  This will be a series detailing landforms and other interesting geology from the air, mainly from photos shot out of the window of a small plane. This week's photo comes from Escalante canyon of Lake …

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